tedx:

The beautiful, sad, shifting state of wild ice: Geomorphologist / photographer James Balog travels the globe to capture the twisting, soaring forms of the world’s vanishing wild ice. In 2009, he wowed the TEDGlobal crowd with his time-lapse photos of the shifting landscapes of the world’s icy habitats.

Above, some striking footage from his project Extreme Ice Survey.

Watch the whole talk here»

Video tagged as: reblog - Reblog from tedx
laboratoryequipment:

Philosopher Examines Einstein Senility ControversyDrawing from Einstein’s collected papers, a philosophy professor has exonerated the theoretician from charges of senility and shows how physics is ultimately indebted to philosophy.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/philosopher-examines-einstein-senility-controversy

laboratoryequipment:

Philosopher Examines Einstein Senility Controversy

Drawing from Einstein’s collected papers, a philosophy professor has exonerated the theoretician from charges of senility and shows how physics is ultimately indebted to philosophy.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/philosopher-examines-einstein-senility-controversy

Photo tagged as: reblog - Reblog from laboratoryequipment

skunkbear:

This is how computers watch movies

prostheticknowledge:

Art project by Benjamin Grosser utilizes computer vision and tracking to visualize points of interest, demonstrated with six popular films. The gifs above are sped-up versions of The Matrix (top) and 2001: A Space Odyssey (bottom):

Computers Watching Movies shows what a computational system sees when it watches the same films that we do. The work illustrates this vision as a series of temporal sketches, where the sketching process is presented in synchronized time with the audio from the original clip. Viewers are provoked to ask how computer vision differs from their own human vision, and what that difference reveals about our culturally-developed ways of looking. Why do we watch what we watch when we watch it? Will a system without our sense of narrative or historical patterns of vision watch the same things?

Computers Watching Movies was computationally produced using software written by the artist. This software uses computer vision algorithms and artificial intelligence routines to give the system some degree of agency, allowing it to decide what it watches and what it does not. Six well-known clips from popular films are used in the work, enabling many viewers to draw upon their own visual memory of a scene when they watch it. The scenes are from the following movies: 2001: A Space Odyssey, American Beauty, Inception, Taxi Driver, The Matrix, and Annie Hall.

Below is an embedded video of the exhibition cut - you can see seperate parts at Benjamin’s website:

More information and videos can be found at Benjamin’s project page here

That green squiggle was my favorite part of the matrix.

Video tagged as: reblog - Reblog from skunkbear

scienceisbeauty:

From the hand of  Andrew Pontzen (@apontzen) and Tom Whyntie (@twhyntie) TED Ed bring us a divulgative introduction (the first in a series) about ‘The Fundamentals of Space-Time’. Very basic but pretty funny. Animation by Giant Animation Studios.

h/t Laughing Squid: TED Animation ‘The Fundamentals of Space-Time’ Breaks Down Complex Physics Concepts in Flipbook Form.

Video tagged as: reblog - Reblog from physicistsneedlovetoo
the-naut:

fencehopping:

Melting aluminum with an electromagnet.

Whaaaaaat

the-naut:

fencehopping:

Melting aluminum with an electromagnet.

Whaaaaaat

Photo tagged as: reblog - Reblog from the-naut

(Source: swagimirlenin)

Photo tagged as: reblog - Reblog from unendingreblogging

OSCILLATE

Video tagged as:

tapejarascience:

'3D printing takes on metal at Amsterdam lab'

Are you a fan of 3D printing? Then you’re going to love this. The Joris Laarman Lab, in Amsterdam, has pioneered 3D printing… with metal!

"As reported in Dezeen, the method combines a robotic arm typically used in car manufacturing with a welding machine to melt and deposit metal, to create lines that can be printed horizontally, vertically, or in curves, without the need for support structures. Adding small amounts of molten metal at a time, lines are printed in mid-air. The team vision is an affordable, multiaxis MX3D tool for workshops around the world."

Follow the link to see a video of it, in use :o)

Via phys.org. Featured here.

Video tagged as: reblog - Reblog from tapejarascience

spaceplasma:

Particles come in pairs, which is why there should be an equal amount of matter and antimatter in the universe. Yet, scientists have not been able to detect any in the visible universe. Where is this missing antimatter? CERN scientist Rolf Landua returns to the seconds after the Big Bang to explain the disparity that allows humans to exist today.

View full lesson: here

(Source: dimensao7)

Video tagged as: reblog - Reblog from colliderblog

ILLUMINATED CODE FROM SPACE

Bioartis Haari Tesla (behance) - "Macrocosm and microcosm is an ancient Greek Neo-Platonic schema of seeing the same patterns reproduced in all levels of the cosmos, from the largest scale (macrocosm or universe-level) all the way down to the smallest scale (microcosm or sub-sub-atomic or even metaphysical-level). In the system the midpoint is Man, who summarizes thecosmos." - I was doing some researches  and I found experiment with miniatures of space so I decided to try my own. The result has been nebulae, galaxies and supernovae transformed into microorganism.

(Source: devidsketchbook)

Video tagged as: reblog - Reblog from cosmicpetunias

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